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This page is devoted to articles written about Leicester's radical past.  These are pieces of research that have not made it into print. Each article is in pdf format and can be downloaded.

Copyright © 2016 Ned Newitt All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

THE RUPERT STREET REVOLT

The Story of Leicester's Rebellion Against the Poor Law

One Friday morning in September 1921,  a demonstration marched on Leicesterís Poor Law Offices, in Rupert Street, to seek justice for the unemployed. In a matter of moments, police wielding truncheons had ruthlessly put down the demonstration and left many of the unemployed bleeding in the roadway with broken heads.

This article tells the story of the conflict between the hopes of those who came back from the WW1 and the reality of the 19th century Poor Law. It also tells of the popular anger at the behaviour of the police which brought crowds out into the centre of Leicester laying siege to the police station. For many, it was a day they were not to forget. For others it was an incident best forgotten.

 

Rupert Street pdf

 

HOUSING THE PEOPLE OF LEICESTER

1900-1950

A History of Council Housing in Leicester
 

Relevance of the Book

In the 21st century, housing has re-emerged as a significant social and political issue. Unaffordable house prices, poor quality rented accommodation, the Grenfell Tower disaster and homelessness have all focused public attention on housing.

This book celebrates the efforts and achievements of Leicesterís municipal housing pioneers who took the view that without good-quality housing, peopleís life chances were dramatically reduced. They wanted to use the power of the Council to replace the misery of the slums with affordable municipal garden suburbs. They set out to realise this dream this against a backdrop of the financial crises created by two World Wars and the zigzags of Government housing policy.

2018 is also the 100th anniversary of Leicesterís attempt to provide homes for the heroes returning from WW1 and it is hoped that this book can contribute some lessons from history to the current debate about housing.

Brief description of the book

For thousands of working people, moving from the town centre to a council house on the outskirts of town was a life changing experience. This book tells the story of Leicesterís oldest council estates: Coleman Road, Kirby, Saffron Lane, Braunstone, Northfields and New Parks.

It looks at the difficulties faced by the Council as it became Leicesterís largest landlord and deals with issues of house design, local politics and social attitudes, as well as the Councilís own organisation. It discusses the missed opportunities, the mistakes and the successes council housing in Leicester.

The book also includes research on Cllr John Tudor Walters & the Winifred Street flats, Humberstone Garden Suburb, the Councilís plans for post war reconstruction, prefabs and tenantsí associations. It contains many previously unpublished photos and house plans.

The book has a fairly large format so photographs and drawings can be seen to effect. (276 x 195mm) It is about 176 pages long and has about 230 pictures, numerous plans and around 55,000 words

The author, Ned Newitt, is a former chair of the old Leicester City Council Housing Committee. 140pp


 

Link coming soon

 

 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

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